York / Sheridan Honours Bachelor of Design Degree

FA/YSDN 1006 Interactivity Design 1

3 credits | Winter Term | Academic Year 2009/10 | YSDN Required | Design Practicum

Course Director: David Gelb
Section M Lab 02: Tuesday 8:30 - 12:30 TEL4031

Instructor: Andrew Hladkyj
Section M Lab 01, Tuesday 8:30 - 12:30 TEL4028

Instructor: Nick Fox-Gieg
Section M Lab 03, Tuesday 8:30 - 12:30 TEL4034

Prerequisite

Prerequisite: FA/YSDN 1001 3.0 or permission of the
Department of Design.

For students not in the B.Des program, Compulsory and Voluntary Supplementary Fees apply.

Course description

Examines and explores the forms of interactivity through designing visual representations of the human computer interface based on the introduction of the developing theories and models of interaction.

Expanded course description

This course starts with a knowledge of visual elements and design principles and extends the students knowledge into interactive media. The course is an introduction to the principles and theories of interactive design and is taught through projects, exercises, presentations and readings.

One of the fundamental characteristics of interactive media is that it is a medium that is displayed on some type of computer. Interactive media is driven by an underlying system of digital data networks. The goal of interactive media design is to offer design solutions that are useful, usable and desirable.

CSchedule

See the project handouts

Required textbook
There is no required textbook for the course. Instead instructors will refer to various texts (online and print) as needed throughout the course.

Course learning objectives

The purpose of this course is to assist students with developing a conceptual and technical framework for approaching interactive design projects and related theoretical issues.

The specific objectives of this course are that students will be able to:
  • Investigate the visual grammar and creative strategies of interactive design
  • Design and communicate multiple interactive concepts with digital and analog tools
  • Articulate individual ideas in visual, oral and written modes
  • Develop code literacy to understand and apply basic programming concepts
  • Undertake independent creative and technical learning and research
  • Integrate and extend principles and practices across the design field
  • Collaborate with peers to develop collective knowledge and skills
  • Perform technical implementation of design concepts into functioning interactions using CSS/HTML and Processing

Schedule

See the project handout.

Required textbook

There is no required textbook for the course. Instead instructors will refer to various texts (online and print) as needed throughout the course.

Recommended readings

The following are useful texts that, though not required, could help you in developing a better understanding of issues related to the content of this course.

  • Bowers, John. Introduction to Two-Dimensional Design: Understanding Form and Function. John Wiley and Sons, 2008.
  • Cameron, Andy. The Art Of Experimental Interaction Design. Gingko Press, 2004.
  • Fry, Ben and Rheas, Casey. Processing: A Programming Handbook for Visual Designers and Artists, MIT Press, 2007.
  • Garett, Jesse James. The Elements of User Experience, New Riders Publishing, 2003.
  • Gotz, Veruschka. Grids for the Interent and other Digital Media, AVA Publishing, 2002.
  • Heller, Steven and Womack, David. Becoming a Digital Designer, John Wiley and Sons, 2008.
  • Leborg, Christian. Visual Grammar, Princeton Architectural Press, 2008.
  • Lupton, Ellen and Cole-Phillips, Jennifer. Graphic Design The New Basics, Princeton Architectural Press, 2008.
  • Saffer, Dan. Designing for Interaction: Creating Smart Applications and Clever Devices, New Riders, 2007.
  • Saffer, Dan. Designing Gestural Interfaces: Touchscreens and Interactive Devices, O’Reilly, 2008.
  • Shiffman, Daniel. Pixels, Patterns, and Processing: A Beginner’s Guide to Programming Images, Animation, and Interaction, Morgan Kaufmann, 2008.

Other Resources

Visual material and case studies in print and video format are available in the Scott Library and on the web, or owned personally by the instructors. The instructor will add to this list through web links and other references as determined by the class activities.

Evaluation and Grading

This course will consist of a combination of lecture, research assignments, hands–on tutorials and creative production of projects. Emphasis will be placed on the exploration of the contextual meanings of time–based and motion graphics, visual syntax and the visual expression, and documentation of the design process.

When grading individual projects/assignments, you will be graded on four distinct aspects of the work.

1. Concept and Ideas - their originality and relevance to the problem - Lateral Thinking abilities, analysis of project requirements, understanding of the problem and its parameters, goals & objectives.

2. Refinement of the Concept - the ability to take the original idea(s) and develop/ improve and apply them - Vertical Thinking abilities, critical evaluation of ideas & solutions.

3. Skills - the technical abilities (understanding & execution) as demonstrated throughout the problem from early sketches to finished state, translation of ideas to visually & technically refined forms.

4. Presentation - the ability to communicate visually, verbally and in written form the systematic and logical direction your synthesis of the problem solving process has taken and appropriateness of the final visual resolution of the project/exercise.

This course consists of 80% project work (both individual and group) and 20% participation (individual) A grade will be given after each phase of the project is submitted. See the project for details.

Grading System

A+ (9) 90–100% exceptional work
A (8) 80–89% excellent work
B+ (7) 75–79% very good work
B (6) 70–74% good
C+ (5) 65–69% competent
C (4) 60–64% fairly competent
D+ (3) 55–59% passing
D (2) 50–54% marginally passing
E (1) marginally below 50% marginally failing
F (0) below 50% inadequate work

Assignment Submission

Proper academic performance depends on students doing their work not only well, but on time. Accordingly, assignments for this course must be received on the due date specified for the assignment. Assignments are to be handed at the beginning of class on the due date.

Lateness Penalty

Assignments received later than the due date will be penalized 10% per day that the assignment is late. Exceptions to the lateness penalty for valid reasons such as illness, compassionate grounds, etc., may be entertained by the Course Instructor but will require supporting documentation (e.g., a doctor’s letter).

Grades will be returned within 2 weeks after a project is due. See the project handout for details.

Last date to drop course

March 09, 2010 is the last day that a student can DROP this course without receiving a grade. Financial penalties may be involved and could be assessed depending on the precise date that the course was dropped.

Important course information for students

All students are expected to familiarize themselves with the following information, available on the Senate

Committee on Curriculum & Academic Standards
http://www.yorku.ca/secretariat/senate_cte_main_pages/ccas.htm
• York’s Academic Honesty Policy and Procedures/Academic Integrity Website
• Ethics Review Process for research involving human participants
• Course requirement accommodation for students with disabilities, including physical, medical, systemic, learning and psychiatric disabilities
• Student Conduct Standards
• Religious Observance Accommodation

Academic honesty and integrity

BDes students are required to maintain high standards of academic integrity and are subject to the Senate Policy on Academic Honesty (http://www.yorku.ca/secretariat/legislation/senate/acadhone.htm).
There is also an academic integrity website with complete information about academic honesty. Students are expected to review the materials on the Academic Integrity website (http://www.yorku.ca/academicintegrity/students.htm).

Occupational health & safety

Students must be aware of ergonomic factors related to the course work and should practice recommended
exercise to prevent developing occupational related health problems. Please refer to the following webpage
for details: www.yorku.ca/dohs/ergonomics.htm

Ethics review process

BDes students are subject to the York University Policy for the Ethics Review Process for Research Involving Human Participants. In particular, students proposing to undertake research involving human participants (e.g., interviewing the director of a company or government agency, having students complete a questionnaire, etc.) are required to submit an Application for Ethical Approval of Research Involving Human Participants at least one month before you plan to begin the research. If you are in doubt as to whether this requirement applies to you, contact your Course Director immediately

Access/Disability

Both York and Sheridan provide services for students with disabilities (including physical, medical, learning and psychiatric disabilities) needing accommodation related to teaching and evaluation methods/materials. Students requiring services from these offices should make contact with the respective offices on both campuses
It is the student’s responsibility to register with disability services as early as possible to ensure that appropriate academic accommodation can be provided with advance notice. You are encouraged to schedule a time early in the term to meet with each professor to discuss your accommodation needs. Failure to make these arrangements may jeopardize your opportunity to receive academic accommodations.

At York University
• Office for Persons with Disabilities: N108 Ross, 416-736-5140, www.yorku.ca/opd
• Learning and Psychiatric Disabilities Programs - Counselling & Development Centre: 130 BSB, 416-736-5297, www.yorku.ca/cdc
• Atkinson students - Atkinson Counselling & Supervision Centre: 114 Atkinson, 416-736- 5225, www.yorku.ca/atkcsc
• Glendon students - Glendon Counselling & Career Centre: Glendon Hall 111, 416-487- 6709, www.glendon.yorku.ca/counselling

At Sheridan College
• Disability Services: Trafalgar Campus, Room B103, 905-845-9430 x2530

Religious observance accommodation

York University is committed to respecting the religious beliefs and practices of all members of the community, and making accommodations for observances of special significance to adherents. Should any of the dates specified in this syllabus for an in-class test or examination pose such a conflict for you, contact the Course Director within the first three weeks of class. Similarly, should an assignment to be completed in a lab, practicum placement, workshop, etc., scheduled later in the term pose such a conflict, contact the Course director immediately. Please note that to arrange an alternative date or time for an examination scheduled in the formal examination periods (December and April/May), students must complete an Examination Accommodation Form, which can be obtained from Student Client Services, Student Services Centre or online athttp://www.registrar.yorku.ca/pdf/exam_accommodation.pdf

Procedures for submitting work

All work is to be turned in personally to the Course Director during the officially scheduled class time.
At York, under normal situations, the Design Office will NOT accept drop-off of student work. In the rare case of illness of the instructor on a due date, special arrangements can be made (between the Course Director and the Office) with the Office for the submission of student work.
In case of unusual circumstances, students at Sheridan may submit their work by depositing it into the drop-off mail slot, provided by the mailroom at Sheridan. Please address your envelope(s) to your instructor and inform the instructor immediately about this special arrangement.
Students should refer to the University Calendar for the proper process of applying for Deferred Standing or requesting Aggregate Standing, if such is applicable.

Student responsibilities

York University is committed to respecting the religious beliefs and practices of all members of the community, and making accommodations for observances of special significance to adherents. Should any of the dates
specified in this syllabus for in-class test or examinations pose such a conflict for you, contact the Course Director within the first two weeks of class. Similarly, should lab, practica, workshop, etc., assignments scheduled later in the term pose such a conflict, contact the Course Director immediately.

It is the responsibility of the student to:
1. always back-up/ save/archive digital work - the hard drives on the computers will be trashed of all student files on a regular basis,
2. read and understand the university Policy on proper use of computing facilities (This policy is posted on the York University web site and posted on Notice Boards in and around the Design studios.), and
3. inform the Course Director, in a timely fashion, of any problems that may interfere with the student’s progress in the course.

Ethics Review Process

BDes students are subject to the York University Policy for the Ethics Review Process for Research Involving Human Participants. In particular, students proposing to undertake research involving human participants (e.g., interviewing the director of a company or government agency, having students complete a questionnaire, etc.) are required to submit an Application for Ethical Approval of Research Involving Human Participants at least one month before you plan to begin the research. If you are in doubt as to whether this requirement applies to you, contact your Course Director immediately

Student conduct

Students and instructors are expected to maintain a professional relationship characterized by courtesy and mutual respect and to refrain from actions disruptive to such a relationship. Moreover, it is the responsibility of the instructor to maintain an appropriate academic atmosphere in the classroom, and the responsibility of the student to cooperate in that endeavour. Further, the instructor is the best person to decide, in the first instance, whether such an atmosphere is present in the class. A statement of the policy and procedures involving disruptive and/or harassing behaviour by students in academic situations is available on the York website http://www.yorku.ca/secretariat/legislation/senate/harass.htm

Please note that this information is subject to periodic update. For the most current information, please go to the CCAS webpage (see Reports, Initiatives, Documents): http://www.yorku.ca/secretariat/senate_cte_main_pages/ccas.htm.